Adopt a Dolphin | Coastal Discovery Museum

ADOPT-A-DOLPHIN

Ever wonder what your favorite dolphin’s name is? Maybe you have seen one in the May River, Port Royal Sound, or off the beach from time to time. Many of these dolphins have been identified and tracked by USCB scientists who photograph their unique dorsal fins, and give them interesting names like Lucky, Stumpy, Nacho, or Beggar.

Now, through a collaboration between USCB’s Lowcountry Dolphin Conservation Program and the Coastal Discovery Museum, you can Adopt-A-Dolphin and learn how to help protect both the Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins that live here year round and those which come here to feed and play in the summer.

LEVELS OF ADOPTION
 
 
LISTENTING TO OUR WATERS

USCB is breaking new ground with its research on sound, which is instrumental in measuring the health of an estuary. Their team can not only detect the vocalizations of dolphins, but also the sounds emitted by their prey and the effects of noise pollution.

Learn More at USCB
Follow USCB's Marine Neuro Lab on Facebook
LISTENTING TO OUR WATERS

USCB is breaking new ground with its research on sound, which is instrumental in measuring the health of an estuary. Their team can not only detect the vocalizations of dolphins, but also the sounds emitted by their prey and the effects of noise pollution.

Learn More at USCB
Follow USCB's Marine Neuro Lab on Facebook
DID YOU KNOW?

Echolocation is how dolphins "see" underwater. By emitting clicks with their nasal sac (known as the "melon"), they can listen for the reflected sound when it returns. Additionally, dolphins communicate with each other via whistles through their blowhole! The underwater world of dolphins is one that relies heavily on sound. Unfortunately, noise pollution caused by shipping, sonar, recreational boats, and oil/gas exploration pose serious threats to the health of dolphins and other marine creatures.

DID YOU KNOW?

Echolocation is how dolphins "see" underwater. By emitting clicks with their nasal sac (known as the "melon"), they can listen for the reflected sound when it returns. Additionally, dolphins communicate with each other via whistles through their blowhole! The underwater world of dolphins is one that relies heavily on sound. Unfortunately, noise pollution caused by shipping, sonar, recreational boats, and oil/gas exploration pose serious threats to the health of dolphins and other marine creatures.

THREATS TO DOLPHINS

As a "sentinel species," dolphins provide invaluable insight into the health of the estuaries they inhabit and the wellbeing of humanity. The challenges these creatures face, including noise and chemical pollution, emerging diseases, and climate change, mirror our own. By studying these issues through scientific research, we can work towards safeguarding these incredible animals and preserving our planet.

THREATS TO DOLPHINS

As a "sentinel species," dolphins provide invaluable insight into the health of the estuaries they inhabit and the wellbeing of humanity. The challenges these creatures face, including noise and chemical pollution, emerging diseases, and climate change, mirror our own. By studying these issues through scientific research, we can work towards safeguarding these incredible animals and preserving our planet.

LOCALS AND TOURISTS

Hilton Head Island is home to both local dolphins that reside here year-round and migratory dolphins that visit the area. These migrant dolphins travel north during the spring and south during the fall, using temperature fluctuations to navigate their way.

LOCALS AND TOURISTS

Hilton Head Island is home to both local dolphins that reside here year-round and migratory dolphins that visit the area. These migrant dolphins travel north during the spring and south during the fall, using temperature fluctuations to navigate their way.

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Mon.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm | Sun. 11am-3pm FREE ADMISSION