Majestic Honey Horn: Discover at Your Leisure

There's a reason the Honey Horn campus is a destination for photo and film shoots, weddings, farmers markets, and memorable events. The sprawling, majestic Grounds and Gardens are a beckoningly beautiful location adorned with 68-acres of exploratory trails, age-old live oaks, specialty gardens arranged for browsing and education, and locally celebrated landscapes and floral designs throughout the property.

Add to this the rarity of century-old buildings with storied pasts, wooden boardwalks stretching into the Jarvis Creek salt marsh, the famous Marsh Tacky horses most often found grazing in the open pasture and you have more than something to do with your afternoon -- you have a memorable encounter and educational experience, one you can visit time and time again because, while the history never changes, there's always something new to discover.

Stop and smell the Camellias, beneath the oaks at Honey Horn.

Majestic Honey Horn: Discover at Your Leisure

There's a reason the Honey Horn campus is a destination for photo and film shoots, weddings, farmers markets, and memorable events. The sprawling, majestic Grounds and Gardens are a beckoningly beautiful location adorned with 68-acres of exploratory trails, age-old live oaks, specialty gardens arranged for browsing and education, and locally celebrated landscapes and floral designs throughout the property.

Add to this the rarity of century-old buildings with storied pasts, wooden boardwalks stretching into the Jarvis Creek salt marsh, the famous Marsh Tacky horses most often found grazing in the open pasture and you have more than something to do with your afternoon -- you have a memorable encounter and educational experience, one you can visit time and time again because, while the history never changes, there's always something new to discover.

Stop and smell the Camellias, beneath the oaks at Honey Horn.

SPECIMEN TREES
AT HONEY HORN

Honey Horn is home to a former state champion Southern Red Cedar tree, one of the largest of its kind in South Carolina and with germination estimated at 1595 – dating back more than 400 years. That crown jewel is joined by a variety of massive live oaks spread throughout the property, many of which were planted in the early 1800s. Species like Bald Cypress, Dogwood, Ginkgo, and Southern Magnolia were planted by previous owners for mostly decorative purposes. Discover other species across the vast 68-acres and learn more about unique varieties like toothache trees, loblolly pines, hackberry and more. Many trees on site have interpretive panels identifying species and providing historic or biological information.

SPECIMEN TREES
AT HONEY HORN

Honey Horn is home to a former state champion Southern Red Cedar tree, one of the largest of its kind in South Carolina and with germination estimated at 1595 – dating back more than 400 years. That crown jewel is joined by a variety of massive live oaks spread throughout the property, many of which were planted in the early 1800s. Species like Bald Cypress, Dogwood, Ginkgo, and Southern Magnolia were planted by previous owners for mostly decorative purposes. Discover other species across the vast 68-acres and learn more about unique varieties like toothache trees, loblolly pines, hackberry and more. Many trees on site have interpretive panels identifying species and providing historic or biological information.

MARSH
FRONT BOARDWALKS

Extending into Jarvis Creek run the museum’s three educational boardwalks, positioned for exploring the tidal creek that borders the museum’s property. These boardwalks and trails are lined with informative interpretive panels on the natural and cultural features of the waterways, estuaries, salt marshes found on and around Hilton Head Island, as well as the abundant marine and wildlife that inhabit them.

MARSH FRONT BOARDWALKS

Extending into Jarvis Creek run the museum’s three educational boardwalks, positioned for exploring the tidal creek that borders the museum’s property. These boardwalks and trails are lined with informative interpretive panels on the natural and cultural features of the waterways, estuaries, salt marshes found on and around Hilton Head Island, as well as the abundant marine and wildlife that inhabit them.

BIRD'S-EYE
VIEW THEATER

This unique outdoor theater is the site of public programs that the Museum offers on a year-round basis. Its designer/artist Walter Palmer is a well-known artisan whose bronze sculptures grace the tops of fountains, pools, and other public spaces throughout the Lowcountry. The theater seats 30, in seating designed to emulate cresting ocean waves.

BIRD'S-EYE
VIEW THEATER

This unique outdoor theater is the site of public programs that the Museum offers on a year-round basis. Its designer/artist Walter Palmer is a well-known artisan whose bronze sculptures grace the tops of fountains, pools, and other public spaces throughout the Lowcountry. The theater seats 30, in seating designed to emulate cresting ocean waves.

REPLICA
SHELL RING

Modeled after shell rings built by local Native American populations as far back as 4,000 years ago, the Coastal Discovery Museum replica is built with real Native American oyster, whelk, and clam shells, along with animal bones and other historic materials. Discover the purpose and presence of shell rings some of their locations throughout the Lowcountry.

REPLICA SHELL RING

Modeled after shell rings built by local Native American populations as far back as 4,000 years ago, the Coastal Discovery Museum replica is built with real Native American oyster, whelk, and clam shells, along with animal bones and other historic materials. Discover the purpose and presence of shell rings some of their locations throughout the Lowcountry.

MARY ANN PEEPLES
PAVILION

This structure, built in 2006, is named after an ardent Museum supporter who helped raise the initial capital funds to renovate and develop Honey Horn as you see it today. The Pavilion is a popular and picturesque site for Hilton Head Island activities at the Coastal Discovery Museum including special events, school and public programming, private parties, and weddings. (Get hitched to your honey at Honey Horn!) The Pavilion is surrounded by some of the most majestic live oaks on the property and furnished with a number of picnic tables creating a scene of endless southern charm.

MARY ANN PEEPLES PAVILION

This structure, built in 2006, is named after an ardent Museum supporter who helped raise the initial capital funds to renovate and develop Honey Horn as you see it today. The Pavilion is a popular and picturesque site for Hilton Head Island activities at the Coastal Discovery Museum including special events, school and public programming, private parties, and weddings. (Get hitched to your honey at Honey Horn!) The Pavilion is surrounded by some of the most majestic live oaks on the property and furnished with a number of picnic tables creating a scene of endless southern charm.

MUSCADINE
GRAPE ARBOR

Historic photographs show the Muscadine Grape Arbor in existence on the property as early as 1940, tracing its history back to the hunting era at Honey Horn when this native grape was harvested for wine and preserves.

MUSCADINE
GRAPE ARBOR

Historic photographs show the Muscadine Grape Arbor in existence on the property as early as 1940, tracing its history back to the hunting era at Honey Horn when this native grape was harvested for wine and preserves.

KAREN WERTHEIMER
BUTTERFLY HABITAT

Populated with native butterflies and flora, a visit to the Karen Wertheimer Butterfly Habitat is a favorite local Hilton Head Island activity. This greenhouse garden and butterfly exhibit is filled with nectar plants to feed the butterflies as well as host plants where butterflies lay their eggs and caterpillars feed. Informational panels throughout the enclosure enhance the visitor experience, detailing the natural history of these insects and explaining how to attract them to your yard. Visitors learn about the four stages of the butterfly’s life cycle from eggs, caterpillars, and chrysalises, to adults. Guided tours of the butterfly enclosure are offered throughout butterfly season (May through October).

KAREN WERTHEIMER
BUTTERFLY HABITAT

Populated with native butterflies and flora, a visit to the Karen Wertheimer Butterfly Habitat is a favorite local Hilton Head Island activity. This greenhouse garden and butterfly exhibit is filled with nectar plants to feed the butterflies as well as host plants where butterflies lay their eggs and caterpillars feed. Informational panels throughout the enclosure enhance the visitor experience, detailing the natural history of these insects and explaining how to attract them to your yard. Visitors learn about the four stages of the butterfly’s life cycle from eggs, caterpillars, and chrysalises, to adults. Guided tours of the butterfly enclosure are offered throughout butterfly season (May through October).

CARNIVOROUS
PLANTS BOG GARDEN

Did you know that the Venus Fly Trap is a native plant to South Carolina? For the more adventurous at heart, you can learn all about insect-eating plants with a visit to the Museum’s Carnivorous Plant Bog Garden. The Garden displays three different kinds of carnivorous plants found in the Lowcountry, including Venus, Sundews, and several species of Pitcher plants, each with their own unique method of trapping insects. Along with a visit to the Camellia Garden, this unique attraction should top your list of Hilton Head Island learning experiences.

CARNIVOROUS
PLANTS BOG GARDEN

Did you know that the Venus Fly Trap is a native plant to South Carolina? For the more adventurous at heart, you can learn all about insect-eating plants with a visit to the Museum’s Carnivorous Plant Bog Garden. The Garden displays three different kinds of carnivorous plants found in the Lowcountry, including Venus, Sundews, and several species of Pitcher plants, each with their own unique method of trapping insects. Along with a visit to the Camellia Garden, this unique attraction should top your list of Hilton Head Island learning experiences.

HERITAGE
GARDEN

The Coastal Discovery Museum’s Heritage Garden features more than 30 plant species that have historical relevance to the Lowcountry. From plants used by local Native American populations, to crops grown by Gullah islanders after the Civil War, this garden is brimming with historical discovery of the plants that helped people survive in the coastal environment of the barrier islands. If you love gardens or history, this should be on your list of things to do on Hilton Head Island.

HERITAGE GARDEN

The Coastal Discovery Museum’s Heritage Garden features more than 30 plant species that have historical relevance to the Lowcountry. From plants used by local Native American populations, to crops grown by Gullah islanders after the Civil War, this garden is brimming with historical discovery of the plants that helped people survive in the coastal environment of the barrier islands. If you love gardens or history, this should be on your list of things to do on Hilton Head Island.

CAMELLIA
GARDEN

The Camellia Garden on Honey Horn is home to 131 varieties of camellia plants on display. The colorful Camellias are close relatives of the tea plant and originated in Asia where they were domesticated and bred for their beautiful flowers. Here you’ll discover examples of the different flower types, color variety, and sizes, some of which were even created in the Lowcountry. All plants are identified with labels and photos of their blooms in a garden that was recently added to the American Camellia Society’s Trail. The best times of year to visit the Camellia Garden are fall, winter, and spring seasons when camellias are blooming on Hilton Head Island.

CAMELLIA GARDEN

The Camellia Garden on Honey Horn is home to 131 varieties of camellia plants on display. The colorful Camellias are close relatives of the tea plant and originated in Asia where they were domesticated and bred for their beautiful flowers. Here you’ll discover examples of the different flower types, color variety, and sizes, some of which were even created in the Lowcountry. All plants are identified with labels and photos of their blooms in a garden that was recently added to the American Camellia Society’s Trail. The best times of year to visit the Camellia Garden are fall, winter, and spring seasons when camellias are blooming on Hilton Head Island.

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